My Amp Has Power But No Sound to Sub

The primary function of a vehicle amplifier is to deliver the extra power required by your subwoofers to produce bass and improve sound quality. The speaker or subwoofer will not play bass if your vehicle amp has power but no sound from the subwoofer and you will not enjoy the sound.

Even if your amp is turned on, there is no sound coming from the sub. In this scenario, there are two possibilities: the stereo’s subwoofer control has been cranked all the way down, or you’re using a defective RCA cable.

If your amp turns on, but no sound emerges from the sub, don’t assume it’s blown out or defective right away. Instead, continue reading to discover how to detect and fix the issue yourself, saving you the effort to see an amp expert or purchase a new amp that you may not require. Learn how to diagnose and resolve this issue.

Let’s see how to increase sound of sub while amp has power.

My Amp Has Power But No Sound to Sub – What to do?

Let’s get right to it and look at the areas you need to investigate to solve this problem.

If The Protect Mode Light Turns On

Certain amplifiers enter the amplifier protect mode to prevent additional damage to internal components. If your amplifier’s “protect” sign is on, you most likely have a bad speaker, subwoofer, cable, or another component. As previously said, check for electricity. After that, have a look at the various components.

Remove the speaker cables first. Visually check each speaker and subwoofer in your system to find the source of the problem. If the light goes out, the issue is most likely with one of the speakers.

A damaged speaker might cause the issue. You may also use an ohmmeter to make sure that none of the speakers are grounded out, which can happen if speaker cables get loose and come into touch with the ground or if the speaker cables come into contact with bare metal.

Check the RCA patch wires if you can’t identify any problems with your speakers. Connect a set of excellent RCA cables to the head unit and amplifier to confirm this. Replace the RCA wires if the light goes out due to this.

Examine The Input and Output of The Amplifier

You can test the input attached to the head unit if the vehicle amp has electricity but no sound in the amps. Examine the RCA wires that link the amplifier to the receiver. Whether your stereo has many RCA outputs, make careful to try each one at a time to see if you can obtain any sound from the sub.

The stereo signals are sent to the amp through the RCA wires. As a result, if they are unplugged or inserted into the incorrect ports, the amplifier will turn on but not play. If the RCA cable is in good condition, the issue may be with the head unit rather than the amplifier.

To be certain, put one end of a 3.5mm-to-RCA adapter into the amp and the other end into your phone, then play some music. If the subwoofers and amplifier are working well, you should examine the head unit for any faults. It’s simple to check the amp’s output, and all you’ll need is another subwoofer. To test your amp, connect the test sub to each amp’s channels one by one. Any flaws with the output should be revealed as a result of this.

Before switching off the electricity, inspect them for damage, taking caution not to touch them. Visually check the cables to identify issues. Use a multi meter to see if the wire is showing any voltage. Replace any broken wires with fresh ones to test whether your subs can produce sound.

Check For Short-Circuiting in The Subwoofer

One of the most prevalent reasons for subwoofer and speaker issues is this. Any metallic item contacting the negative and positive rods at the sub’s terminal and the cone will cause the system to short out.

Short-circuiting is a difficult problem to discover. When you switch on the amp, you’ll see it, but there’s no sound from the sub. Connect your sub to another amp to rule out a short circuit. If there is still no sound, the cables may have burned out, and no electrical signal is sent to the sub. One of the most prevalent reasons for subwoofer and speaker issues is this. Any metallic item contacting the negative and positive rods at the sub’s terminal and the cone will cause the system to short out.

Short-circuiting is a difficult problem to discover. When you switch on the amp, you’ll see it, but there’s no sound from the sub. Connect your sub to another amp to rule out a short circuit. If there is still no sound, the cables may have burned out, and no electrical signal is sent to the sub.

Your Sub’s Electromagnetic Coil and Cone Seal Should Be Checked

Check the sub’s electromagnetic coil and cone seal if your amp is turned on, but no voice comes from the subs. This is one of the most sensitive and thorough checks you’ll ever have to conduct.

Begin by turning on the television. Examine how the cone is attached to the container once you’ve gained access to the inside components. The cone of your sub is in charge of providing the final audio output. It oscillates back and forth, pushing and pulling air. The seal will not be able to move as it should and will not create sound if it is cracked or loose.

If the electromagnetic coil in the sub is burned out or out of alignment, it will not produce the intense electromagnetic field required to work with the magnet required to make a sound.

What If I Hear Hissing from My Subwoofer?

Examine the speaker wires and patch cables. If the wires connecting the head unit and amplifier cross any power or ground lines, intervention might occur, resulting in distortions. The speaker cables are the same way. The solution is straightforward: If required, reroute the wires so that they do not come close to any power or ground lines and cross at a 90-degree angle. Using higher-quality cables or wires with adequate shielding may also be beneficial.

Unplug the speakers from the amp if you can’t detect any problems with how the patch cables or speaker wires are routed. If the sounds persist, look for faulty ground.

If The Amplifier Sounds Like It’s Clipping?

Clipping is usually caused by an insufficient amp or poor speakers in a home audio system. In autos, lost or burned wiring can cause similar issues. The most common reason for clipping is an under powered amplifier, in which case you’ll need to either update the amp or reduce the speakers. Compare the power rating of the amp to the speaker’s power rating.

If the amplifier has enough power for the job, the issue might be with the speaker cables, speakers, or the amplifier’s ground.

Conclusion

Everyone enjoys listening to music while driving. However, all musical instruments are susceptible to failure. If your amplifier turns on, but no sound comes from the speakers, it might signal various issues for which you are or are not prepared. That’s why we recommend seeking professional assistance, especially if you’re new to automotive audio.

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